Tony Auth Dies, Queen Lane Goes Boom; Why’s Temple Itchy?

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Newsletter for Monday, Sept. 15

RIP TONY AUTH


The late Tony Auth, left, with fellow cartoonist Rob Tornoe in 2013. via Instagram user @edp123

Editor’s note: This is the first of Billy Penn’s daily newsletters. Once each weekday, we’ll round up the stories and events worth talking about. They’ll hit your inbox in the morning. You’re receiving these because you signed up for updates at brother.ly or billypenn.com. Did we miss something? Want to sound off? I’m chris@billypenn.com — hit me up any time. And thanks for your support. — Chris Krewson, Editor, Billy Penn

HIS INK WON THE INQ A PULITZER

Tony Auth, the longtime Philadelphia Inquirer editorial cartoonist whose cartoons captured the mood of the city and the nation, died at age 72 after a battle with metastatic brain cancer. Auth spent 41 years at the Inq, where, his obituary notes, he drew thousands of cartoons. In 2012, he took a buyout, working for the past two years at WHYY’s NewsWorks — where, as his longtime Inquirer colleague Chris Satullo wrote Sunday, “even at the age of 70, he embraced with joy… the challenges of translating his ink-stained craft into the new modes of digital animation and audio.” *

TEMPLE STUDENTS START ITCHIN’ FOR THE SUBWAY

Here’s another reason for the Broad Street line to give you the creeps — more than 100 Temple University students have been treated by the school’s University Health Services department for a nasty skin infection, the Daily News reports. While not all those have ridden the rails, others have tied the ailment to a pair of wooden benches at the Cecil B. Moore stop. SEPTA’s not confirming or denying anything, but it’s power-washed the potential trouble seats, as well as treating them with insecticide and repainting them — just in case. And they’ll (eventually) be replaced with (theoretically less germy) metal benches. *Shudder.*


TONIGHT: GET YOUR DANCE ON

WHAT: Salsa dancing lessons
WHERE: Vango Lounge & Skybar
WHEN: 5-5:30 PM
HOW MUCH: Free
DETAILS/ADD TO MY CALENDAR

BILLY PENN LIKES

SHADY MCCOY’S INFAMOUS 20-CENT TIP RECEIPT IS ON EBAY

For the low, low price of $750, you could be the proud owner of the receipt that got America talking. Yep, the disaffected server at Tommy Up’s PYT is up for a much bigger payday once that EBay auction ends. (via Philly.com)

BOOM, CLAP: WATCH THE QUEEN LANE BUILDING IMPLOSION (VIDEO)

That big series of booms you heard Saturday morning? That was the high-rise Queen Lane Apartments, which took just 7 minutes to crumple into dust, thanks to well-placed TNT inside its support pillars. (Watch the raw video; it’s worth the minute and a half.) The  building, which went up in 1955, came down to make way for a 55-unit development that will include low-rise flats, walkups and townhouses, per NBC10.

* Correction: Tony Auth won a Pulitzer Prize for the Inquirer in 1976, but it wasn’t the Inquirer’s first Pulitzer. That honor went to Donald Barlett and James Steele.

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Editor


Chris Krewson is the executive director of LION Publishers, a national nonprofit association that serves local journalism entrepreneurs build sustainable news organizations, and the founding editor of Billy Penn. He lives in Havertown.