Grace Stanton stitches a large flag for the 1951 Fourth of July celebration in Fairmount Park

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The Fourth of July feels extra special in Philadelphia, the birthplace of America.

These snapshots of Philly history — some comforting, others not so much — serve as a reminder of how this city has celebrated Independence Day over the last century.

1926

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

A seated crowd and light traffic outside of the Art Museum while a program is conducted on the steps. People are also gathered on Eakins Oval to hear the program.

1927

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Not all historic celebrations should be celebrated years later. In 1927, the Ku Klux Klan observed of the Fourth of July with a parade in Frankford.

1951

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Grace Stanton stitches a large flag for the annual Fourth of July celebration in Fairmount Park.

1958

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Portraits of the presidents of the United States, each on a six-by-eight foot canvas, are assembled in Independence Mall for the 14th annual Bulletin Independence Day celebration.

1970

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

A family enjoys a picnic at Fairmount Park on the Schuylkill River bank while watching the annual Independence Day Regatta.

1973

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Prize-winning participants in the morning Lawncrest parade were Sandy Connor, 9, and her brother, John, 12, of Benner Street, who rode a float as Martha and George Washington.

1976

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Women discuss the Fourth of July Coalition at Frankford Avenue and Overington Street.

1978

Credit: Philadelphia Evening Bulletin / Temple University Archives

Fireworks explode over Independence Hall.

Anna Orso was a reporter/curator at Billy Penn from 2014 to 2017.