Headlines of Yore

After a 1958 arson, Delco town tried to seize local NAACP leader’s new house

Civil rights leader George T. Raymond tried to move into an all-white suburb.

The house condemned by Rutledge officials after they denied a repair permit to George T. Raymond following a fire

The house condemned by Rutledge officials after they denied a repair permit to George T. Raymond following a fire

Sam Myers / AP Photo
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In the 1950s and ’60s, local NAACP leader George T. Raymond helped desegregate area schools, movie theaters and restaurants. He didn’t back down easily, which is probably the only reason he was able to keep a house he bought in Rutledge, Delaware County.

After news got out the Raymonds were moving in, things got violent — and the borough government only exacerbated the trouble.

This is the story of a Black family that attempted to integrate an all-white Philly suburb.

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