Election 2020

These are the 90+ elected officials from Pa. who supported challenges to Biden’s win

Several major corporations are stopping donations to lawmakers on this list, which includes eight congressional reps and more than 80 state reps.

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Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons
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The insurrection at the U.S. Capitol last week didn’t come out of nowhere. For months and even years leading up to the violent breach, many at the federal, state and local levels of government incited anger, fear, and a fundamental mistrust of the same process that got them elected.

It wasn’t just President Donald Trump. The ranks include nearly 100 elected officials in Pennsylvania.

Some lawmakers representing the commonwealth chose to object to certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win even after the Jan. 6 coup attempt, when the House and Senate reconvened in broken quarters to finish what they’d started earlier that day.

A preview of the chaos erupted earlier this month at the Pa. State House when Republicans refused to seat Democrat Sen. Jim Brewster, whose election had already been certified. During the debate, GOP senators removed Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman from presiding over the session. On Tuesday a federal court ruled Brewster should be seated.

It’s unclear if the politicians involved in Washington or Harrisburg will face official censure from their colleagues. But repercussions are already beginning to roll down.

A handful of PACs for major corporations have vowed to cease campaign contributions to legislators who voted against accepting Biden’s win. So far the list of companies stopping donations includes Citibank, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Marriott, Commerce Bank, and Philly-based Comcast.

We likely haven’t seen the last of this. The FBI has warned there are plans for armed protests in all 50 state capitals ahead of Inauguration Day.

Who exactly helped incite these reactions, and sow distrust in U.S. elections? Here’s the eight U.S. reps from Pennsylvania who voted against certifying the election — and 80+ more state politicians who contested the commonwealth’s rules.

U.S. Congress

These representatives from Pa. all voted against certifying the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6.

Rep. John Joyce

District: 13 — South Central Pa., including parts of Somerset and Franklin counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Fred Keller

District: 12 — North Central Pa., repping much of the Susquehanna Valley, including Hazleton and State College
First elected: 2019 (in the May special election)

Rep. Mike Kelly

District: 16 — Western Pa., including Butler, Erie and Mercer counties
First elected: 2010

Rep. Daniel Meuser

District: 9 — Central Pa., encompassing a bunch of counties including Columbia, Lebanon and Schuylkill counties and parts of Berks and Luzerne counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Scott Perry

District: 10 — Central Pa., which includes Harrisburg and parts of York
First elected: 2012

Rep. Guy Reschenthaler

District: 14 — Western Pa., encompassing Washington, Fayette, Greene and parts of Westmoreland counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Lloyd Smucker

District: 11 — South Central Pa., including parts of Lancaster and York counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Glenn Thompson

District: 15 — Western Pa., including parts of Butler and Centre counties
First elected: 2008

Pa. General Assembly

In December, dozens of Pa. legislators sent a letter to Attorney General Josh Shapiro, asking him to appoint an independent prosecutor to review so-called “election irregularities.” The attorney general responded on Twitter saying such a move would not be allowed under state law.

These are the elected officials who signed the letter. Some have continued to cheer the anti-Biden crowds, while others have recanted.

Sen. Scott Martin

District: 13 — Central Pa., which covers part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2016

Sen. Scott Hutchinson

District: 21 — Western Pa., including parts of Butler, Clarion, Forest, Venango and Warren counties
First elected: 2012

Sen. Gene Yaw

District: 23 — North Central Pa., including parts of Bradford, Lycoming, Union, Sullivan and Susquehanna counties
First elected: 2008

Sen. Kristin Phillips-Hill

District: 28 — Southeastern Pa., including York County
First elected: 2018

Sen. David Argall

District: 29 — Central Pa., including parts of Schuylkill and Berks counties
First elected: 2009 (in a March special election)

Sen. Judy Ward

District: 30 — South Central Pa., including parts of Blair, Cumberland, Franklin, Fulton and Huntingdon counties
First elected: 2018

Sen. Mike Regan

District: 31 — South Central Pa., including Cumberland and York counties
First elected: 2016

Sen. Pat Stefano

District: 32 — Southwestern Pa., including Somerset and Fayette counties
First elected: 2014

Sen. Doug Mastriano

District: 33 — Southwestern Pa., including Franklin and Adams counties
First elected: 2019 (in a May special election)

Sen. Wayne Langerholc

District: 35 — Central Pa., including parts of Clearfield, Cambria and Bedford counties
First elected: 2016

Sen. Ryan Aument

District: 36 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2014

Sen. Joe Pittman

District: 41 — Western Pa., including parts of Armstrong and Indiana counties
First elected: 2019 (in a May special election)

Sen. Camera Bartolotta

District: 46 — Western Pa., including parts of Beaver, Washington and Greene counties
First elected: 2014

Sen. Dave Arnold

District: 48 — Central Pa., including parts of Lebanon, Dauphin and York counties
First elected: 2020 (in a January special election)

Sen. Michele Brooks

District: 50 — Western Pa., including parts of Erie, Crawford, Mercer and Warren counties
First elected: 2014

Rep. Curt Sonney

District: 4 — Northwestern Pa., including part of Erie County
First elected: 2004

Rep. Brad Roae

District: 6 — Western Pa., including parts of Crawford and Erie counties
First elected: 2006

Rep. Aaron Bernstine

District: 10 — Western Pa., including Beaver, Butler and Lawrence counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Marci Mustello

District: 11 — Western Pa., including part of Butler County
First elected: 2019 (in a May special election)

Rep. Parke Wentling

District: 17 — Western Pa., including parts of Crawford, Erie, Lawrence and Mercer counties
First elected: 2014

Rep. Kathleen Tomlinson

District: 18 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2020

Rep. Cris Dush

District: 25 — Central Pa., including parts of Jefferson and Indiana counties
First elected: 2020

Rep. Tim Hennessey

District: 26 — Central Pa., including parts of Montgomery and Chester counties
First elected: 1992

Rep. Meghan Schroeder

District: 29 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2019 (in a January special election)

Rep. Mindy Fee

District: 37 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2012

Rep. Natalie Mihalek

District: 40 — Western Pa., including parts of Washington and Allegheny counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Brett Miller

District: 41 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Keith Greiner

District: 43 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2012

Rep. Bud Cook

District: 49 — Western Pa., including parts of Fayette and Washington counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Matt Dowling

District: 51 — Southwestern Pa., including parts of Fayette and Somerset counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Ryan Warner

District: 52 — Southwestern Pa., including parts of Fayette and Westmoreland counties
First elected: 2014

Rep. George Dunbar

District: 56 — Western Pa., including part of Westmoreland County
First elected: 2010

Rep. Eric Nelson

District: 57 — Western Pa., including part of Westmoreland County
First elected: 2016 (in a March special election)

Rep. Eric Davanzo

District: 58 — Southwestern Pa., including part of Westmoreland County
First elected: 2020 (in a March special election)

Rep. Mike Reese

Reese died from a brain aneurysm on Jan. 2. He was 42 years old.

District: 59 — Western Pa., including parts of Somerset and Westmoreland counties
First elected: 2008

Rep. Jim Struzzi

District: 62 — Central Pa., including part of Indiana County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Donna Oberlander

District: 63 — Central Pa., including parts of Armstrong, Clarion and Forest counties
First elected: 2008

Rep. Lee James

District: 64 — Western Pa., including parts of Butler and Venango counties
First elected: 2012

Rep. Kathy Rapp

District: 65 — Northwestern Pa., including parts of Crawford, Forest and Warren counties
First elected: 2004

Rep. Martin Causer

District: 67 — North Central Pa., including parts of Cameron, Mckean and Potter counties
First elected: 2002

Rep. Clint Owlett

District: 68 — North Central Pa., including parts of Bradford, Tioga and Potter counties
First elected: 2018 (in a June special election)

Rep. Carl Walker Metzgar

District: 69 — South Central Pa., including parts of Bedford and Somerset counties
First elected: 2008

Rep. Thomas Sankey

District: 73 — Central Pa., including parts of Cambria and Clearfield counties
First elected: 2012

Rep. Jesse Topper

District: 78 — South Central Pa., including parts of Bedford, Franklin and Fulton counties
First elected: 2014 (in a January special election)

Rep. Lou Schmitt

District: 79 — Central Pa., including part of Blair County
First elected: 2018

Rep. James Gregory

District: 80 — Central Pa., including part of Blair County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Rich Irvin

District: 81 — Central Pa., including parts of Centre, Huntingdon and Middlin counties
First elected: 2014

Rep. John Hershey

District: 82 — Central Pa., including parts of Juniata, Franklin and Mifflin counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Jeff Wheeland

District: 83 — Central Pa., including part of Lycoming County
First elected: 2014

Rep. David Rowe

District: 85 — Central Pa., including parts of Snyder and Union counties
First elected: 2019 (in an August special election)

Rep. Perry Stambaugh

District: 86 — Central Pa., including parts of Cumberland and Perry counties
First elected: 2020

Rep. Greg Rothman

District: 87 — Central Pa., including part of Cumberland County
First elected: 2015 (in an August special election)

Rep. Sheryl Delozier

District: 88 — Central Pa., including part of Cumberland County
First elected: 2008

Rep. Paul Schemel

District: 90 — South Central Pa., including part of Franklin County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Dan Moul

District: 91 — South Central Pa., including part of Adams County
First elected: 2006

Rep. Dawn Keefer

District: 92 — South Central Pa., including parts of Cumberland and York counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Mike Jones

District: 93 — South Central Pa., including part of York County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Steven Mentzer

District: 97 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2012

Rep. David Hickernall

District: 98 — Central Pa., including parts of Dauphin and Lancaster counties
First elected: 2002

Rep. Bryan Cutler, House Majority Leader

District: 100 — Central Pa., including part of Lancaster County
First elected: 2006

Rep. Frank Ryan

District: 101 — Central Pa., including part of Lebanon County
First elected: 2016

Rep. Andrew Lewis

District: 105 — Central Pa., including part of Dauphin County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Tom Mehaffie

District: 106 — Central Pa., including part of Dauphin County
First elected: 2016

Rep. David Millard

District: 109 — Central Pa., including part of Columbia County
First elected: 2004

Rep. Tina Pickett

District: 110 — North Central Pa., including parts of Bradford, Sullivan and Susquehanna counties
First elected: 2000

Rep. Jonathan Fritz

District: 111 — Northeast Pa., including parts of Susquehanna and Wayne counties
First elected: 2016

Rep. Aaron Kaufer

District: 120 — Northeast Pa., including part of Luzerne County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Doyle Heffley

District: 122 — Central Pa., including part of Carbon County
First elected: 2010

Rep. Mark Gillen

District: 128 — Central Pa., including parts of Berks and Lancaster counties
First elected: 2010

Rep. Jim Cox

District: 129 — Central Pa., including parts of Berks and Lancaster counties
First elected: 2006

Rep. David Maloney

District: 130 — Central Pa., including part of Berks County
First elected: 2010

Rep. Ryan Mackenzie

District: 134 — Central Pa., including parts of Berks and Lehigh counties
First elected: 2012 (in an April special election)

Rep. Michael Peifer

District: 139 — Northeast Pa., including parts of Pike and Wayne counties
First elected: 2006

Rep. Frank Farry

District: 142 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2008

Rep. Todd Polinchock

District: 144 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Craig Staats

District: 145 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Craig Williams

District: 160 — Southeastern Pa., including parts of Chester and Delaware counties
First elected: 2020

Rep. Kate Klunk

District: 169 — South Central Pa., including part of York County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Martina White

District: 170 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Philadelphia County
First elected: 2015 (in a March special election)

Rep. Kerry Benninghoff, Majority Leader

District: 171 — Central Pa., including part of Centre and Mifflin counties
First elected: 1996

Rep. Jack Rader

District: 176 — Eastern Pa., including part of Monroe County
First elected: 2014

Rep. Wendi Thomas

District: 178 — Southeastern Pa., including part of Bucks County
First elected: 2018

Rep. Torren Ecker

District: 193 — South Central Pa., including parts of Adams and Cumberland counties
First elected: 2018

Rep. Seth Grove

District: 196 — South Central Pa., including part of York County
First elected: 2008

Rep. Barbara Gleim

District: 199 — Central Pa., including part of Cumberland County
First elected: 2018

Want some more? Explore other Election 2020 stories.

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